Monday, 20 January 2020 22:35

LEVETIRACETAM RECALL!

Written by Law Offices Of Gary Green

Another dangerous drug recall. This time it’s a microbial contamination problem, not a problem with the recipe. The good thing—people who benefit from the drug still will be able to acquire it, just be aware and careful while the contaminated lots are switched out.

LEVETIRACETAM (generic for trade names KEPPRA, Elepsia) is an anticonvulsant to treat seizure disorders (epilepsy).

It is not known how the drug works.

Lannett Company has announced a recall of 2 lots of Levetiracetam Oral Solution, 100mg/ml packaged in 16 fluid oz bottles. Lots 2190A and 2191A, NDC # 54838-548-80, expiration date 07/2021. Can be identified by the lot and NDC #s.

Dosage, duration, and underlying conditions are relative to how someone could be affected. Those with compromised immune systems are most at risk.

Contact your pharmacy regarding switching out bad lots.

Contact the manufacturer with other medical Questions: 844 834-0530; or contact your physician.

This is a PSA, a warning; not a call to arms. There’s no compensation unless someone gets sick.

Law Offices of Gary Gren is currently keeping up with over 20 dangerous products and drugs.

The three most active are:

3M military earplugs-hearing loss/tinnitus;
Hernia/surgical mesh with revisions;
Glyphosate (Roundup) linked to blood cancers, non hodgkins lymphoma.

For further information visit gGreen.com.

Thursday, 2 January 2020 22:08

Glyphosate/Roundup

Written by Law Offices Of Gary Green

Why Is Glyphosate Sprayed on Crops Right Before Harvest?

By: Ken Roseboro
March 05, 2016 01:13PM

Glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, is recognized as the world’s most widely used weed killer. What is not so well known is that farmers also use glyphosate on crops such as wheat, oats, edible beans and other crops right before harvest, raising concerns that the herbicide could get into food products.

Escalating Use of Probable Carcinogen

Glyphosate has come under increased scrutiny in the past year. Last year the World Health Organization’s cancer group, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, classified it as a probable carcinogen. The state of California has also moved to classify the herbicide as a probable carcinogen. A growing body of research is documenting health concerns of glyphosate as an endocrine disruptor and that it kills beneficial gut bacteria, damages the DNA in human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells and is linked to birth defects and reproductive problems in laboratory animals.

What is not so well known is that farmers also use glyphosate on crops such as wheat, oats, edible beans and other crops right before harvest.

A recently published paper describes the escalating use of glyphosate: 18.9 billion pounds have been used globally since its introduction in 1974, making it the most widely and heavily applied weed-killer in the history of chemical agriculture. Significantly, 74 percent of all glyphosate sprayed on crops since the mid-1970s was applied in just the last 10 years, as cultivation of GMO corn and soybeans expanded in the U.S. and globally.

Glyphosate Used to Speed Up Wheat Harvest

Charles Benbrook, Ph.D., who published the paper on the mounting use of glyphosate, says the practice of spraying glyphosate on wheat prior to harvest, known as desiccating, began in Scotland in the 1980s.

“Farmers there often had trouble getting wheat and barley to dry evenly so they can start harvesting. So they came up with the idea to kill the crop (with glyphosate) one to two weeks before harvest to accelerate the drying down of the grain,” he said.

The pre-harvest use of glyphosate allows farmers to harvest crops as much as two weeks earlier than they normally would, an advantage in northern, colder regions.

The practice spread to wheat-growing areas of North America such as the upper Midwestern U.S. and Canadian provinces such as Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

“Desiccation is done primarily in years where conditions are wet and the crop is slow to dry down,” Joel Ransom, an agronomist at North Dakota State University, said.

Ransom says desiccating wheat with glyphosate has been a useful tool for farmers.

“It does help hasten dry down and controls grain weeds and other material that slows down the threshing practice,” he said. “It has an important role in areas where it’s wet.”

Ransom says the practice has increased in North Dakota, which is the leading wheat-producing state in the U.S., over the past 15 years due to wetter weather.

While more common in Upper Midwestern states where there is more moisture, desiccation is less likely to be done in drier wheat growing areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Washington and Oregon.

All Conventional Farmers in Saskatchewan Desiccate Wheat

According to a wheat farmer in Saskatchewan, desiccating wheat with glyphosate is commonplace in his region. “I think every non-organic farmer in Saskatchewan uses glyphosate on most of their wheat acres every year,” the farmer speaking on condition of anonymity said.

He has concerns about the practice. “I think farmers need to realize that all of the chemicals we use are ‘bad’ to some extent,” he said. “Monsanto has done such an effective job marketing glyphosate as ‘safe’ and ‘biodegradable’ that farmers here still believe this even though such claims are false.”

The vast majority of farmers in Manitoba, Canada’s third largest wheat producing province, also use glyphosate on wheat, said Gerald Wiebe, a farmer and agricultural consultant. “I would estimate that 90 to 95 percent of wheat acres in Manitoba are sprayed pre-harvest with glyphosate; the exception would be in dry areas of the province where moisture levels at harvest time are not an issue,” he said.

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy

According to Tom Ehrhardt, co-owner of Minnesota-based Albert Lea Seeds, sourcing grains not desiccated with glyphosate prior to harvest is a challenge.

“I have talked with millers of conventionally produced grain and they all agree it’s very difficult to source oats, wheat, flax and triticale, which have not been sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest,” he said. “It’s a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell policy’ in the industry.”

Ehrhardt also says that crops grown to produce seed are not usually sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest because this can damage seed germination.

Grain Millers, which has grain processing facilities in the U.S. and Canada, announced last year that it would not buy oats from Canada that had been desiccated with glyphosate. The company’s Canadian procurement manager, Terry Tyson, told Western Producer that glyphosate disrupts the natural maturing process and starch development, resulting in lower quality flakes and flour. He said the decision had nothing to do with health or safety concerns.

“Would Rather Not Eat a Loaf of Bread With Glyphosate In It”

Still, there are obvious concerns about glyphosate getting into food products.

“We are told these (glyphosate residues) are too small to matter but can we believe that?” the Saskatchewan farmer asked. “I think everyone, even farmers that use and love glyphosate, would rather not eat a loaf of bread with glyphosate in it.”

Wiebe shares similar concerns. “Consumers don’t realize when they buy wheat products like flour, cookies and bread they are getting glyphosate residues in those products,” he said. “It’s barbaric to put glyphosate in food a few days before you harvest it.”

Wiebe believes the use of glyphosate on wheat may be connected to the rise in celiac disease. “We’ve seen an explosion of gluten intolerance,” he said. “What’s really going on?”

“Can you imagine the public’s response if they knew that glyphosate is being sprayed on the oats in their Cheerios only weeks before it is manufactured?” Ehrhardt asked.

Residues of glyphosate have been found in wheat flour. Last year, Ransom reported to the U.S. Wheat Quality Council that tests on flour samples from the U.S. and Canada found that all had traces of glyphosate. However, Ransom said these were well below the maximum residue limits for glyphosate in wheat, which are 30 parts per million in the U.S.

Still, Ransom said: “I wouldn’t be surprised if someone repeated the test and found traces also.”

In response to mounting concerns over the escalating use of glyphosate, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently said it would begin testing foods for glyphosate residues.

Powerful Effect on Food System

Along with wheat and oats, glyphosate is used to desiccate a wide range of other crops including lentils, peas, non-GMO soybeans, corn, flax, rye, triticale, buckwheat, millet, canola, sugar beets and potatoes. Sunflowers may also be treated pre-harvest with glyphosate, according to the National Sunflower Association.

Benbrook says that a large portion of edible beans grown in Washington and Idaho are desiccated with glyphosate.

There are no statistics kept on the number of acres of wheat or other crops that are desiccated with glyphosate, according to Ransom.

While the pre-harvest use of glyphosate may account for a small amount of overall use of the herbicide, Benbrook says this still has a huge impact. “It may be two percent of agriculture use, but well over 50 percent of dietary exposure,” he said.

Further, he said: “I don’t understand why Monsanto and the food industry don’t voluntarily end this practice. They know it contributes to high dietary exposure (of glyphosate).”

Wiebe sees the situation in dire terms. “The most tragic thing is that industry is encouraging the use of glyphosate on wheat, farmers are using it, consumers are unaware of it and it’s having a powerful effect on the food system,” he said.

References

  1. Romano RM, Romano MA, Bernardi MM, Furtado PV, Oliveira CA. “Prepubertal exposure to commercial formulation of the herbicide Glyphosate alters testosterone levels and testicular morphology.” Arch Toxicol. 2010;84:309-317.
  2. Awad A. Shehata, Wieland Schrodl, Alaa. A. Aldin, Hafez M. Hafez, Monika Kruger. “The Effect of Glyphosate on Potential Pathogens and Beneficial Members of Poultry Microbiota In Vitro” Curr Microbiol. Dec 9, 2012.
  3. Mañas F., Peralta L., Raviolo J., et al. “Genotoxicity of glyphosate assessed by the Comet assay and cytogenic tests.” Env Toxicol Pharmacol. 2009; 28:37–41.
  4. Antoniou M., Habib MEM, Howard CV, et al. “Teratogenic effects of glyphosate-based herbicides: Divergence of regulatory decisions from scientific evidence.” J Env Anal Toxicol. 2012;S4:006. doi:10.4172/2161-0525.S4-006.
  5. Benbrook, C. “Trends in glyphosate herbicide use in the United States and globally.” Environmental Sciences Europe (2016, 28:28) DOI: 10.1186/s12302-016-0070-0.
  6. Arnason, Robert. “Oat buyer says no glyphosate pre-harvest.” Western Producer. April 22, 2015.
  7. Gillam, Carey. “Fears Over Roundup Herbicide Prompts Testing Of Cereals, Breastmilk, and More.” Reuters News Service. April 10, 2015.
  8. Gillam, Carey. “FDA to Start Testing for Glyphosate in Food.” Civil Eats. February 17, 2016.
  9. “Preharvest Staging Guide.”
  10. eu. “Clarification of Preharvest use of Glyphosate.”

The jury is in!
They’re not good for you.
You might die!
Now that’s a good warning…

EVALI, e-cigarette vaping associated lung injury, is the name given by the CDC to the recent rash of deaths and lung injuries noticed across the country.

Feel sorry for those who used these products in an attempt to quit smoking.

Per the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), 29 samples of lung fluid from 10 different states (They’ve found the pattern !) have common ingredient, vitamin E acetate, a synthetic form of vitamin E. Vitamin E acetate now has been pronounced by the CDC as a chemical of concern. It is found in both tobacco and cannabis inhalers/vape pens.

Vitamin E acetate, a pale yellow viscous liquid, is similar to THC oil in consistency, thus one reason for its use as a cutting agent in the cannabis vape pens; commonly used in many products and apparently safe when rubbed on skin in a cream, or even when ingested in food, but not when heated. It has been described as having the consistency of grease! Greases turn solid at rather low temperatures. The melting point for vitamin E acetate is 97 degrees F.

These precautions apply to usage with both tobacco and cannabis.

Investigation continues. It might be found that vitamin E acetate is not the only culprit. There have been other injuries from e-cigarettes exploding- probably battery issues; or other chemicals might be reacting with the acetate.

If a medicine has to be smoked, it’s probably not a good idea; if one is trying to stop smoking, at least for now, vaping probably is not a good alternative; at least for now, altogether, vaping is not advised.

Over 40 deaths.

Over 2000 lung injuries including at least one double lung transplant.

Law Offices of Gary Green is investigating cases involving permanent injury or death- not handling addiction cases.

There must be a lab finding of vitamin E acetate, and products must have been purchased from a legitimate company. (Their products might be bootleg , but the company cannot be!) You cannot purchase a vape pen off the street, suffer injury, then expect to sue someone!

Increasingly, nursing homes are requiring that residents give up their right to jury trial upon admission to a facility. We encourage our colleagues who represent consumers and their families to advise against signing these agreements.

Placing a loved one in a nursing home is one of life’s most stressful events. The stress is compounded by the blizzard of paperwork that is thrown at the family during this difficult time. Admission agreement, responsible party agreement, guarantor agreement, assignment of benefits, resident personal account, medical release, notice of privacy practices — these are just a few of the dozens of documents that residents (or a family member, acting as the resident’s representative) are required to sign upon admission.

Sometimes hidden in this mountain of documents is an arbitration agreement. The arbitration agreement may be glossed over by the admission representative as “just another document we need to you sign” near the bottom of a pile of documents. The arbitration agreement may look like this:

“We do not expect that you will be dissatisfied with any of the services provided to you during your stay. However, no matter how much effort each of us puts into our new relationship, there is always a possibility that a dispute may arise between us for a variety of reasons. Historically, when differences have arisen between a resident and a facility that were unable to be resolved informally, a lawsuit may have been filed in state court. Needless to say, formal litigation involving the state court system has proven to be an exhaustive and time-consuming venture for all parties. Through a voluntary arbitration program entered into via the voluntary arbitration agreement, we are offering a less formal manner to reach a final determination. The program is designed to resolve residency related disputes in a more efficient manner than claims brought in state court.”

Nowhere does this language mention that the resident is giving up her right to a jury trial if she suffers neglect or abuse. And, the resident gets nothing in return for signing the agreement. In many cases, the resident and her family do not realize that the nursing home resident’s rights have been taken away until after a fall, an infection caused by an untreated decubitus ulcer, severe dehydration and malnutrition, or some other failure of care resulting in severe injury or death.

 

Monday, 3 July 2017 13:37

Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

Written by Law Offices Of Gary Green

A mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result from any type of damage to the cranium. A mild TBI is no different from a concussion, and the terms are interchangeable. The most common causes of ER visits for TBI are falls, blunt trauma to the head, car wrecks, and assaults.

Symptoms of a mild TBI include:

  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Memory loss
  • Seizure
  • Dizziness/loss of balance
  • Visual disturbances
  • Irritability/emotional disturbances
  • Poor attention/trouble with concentration

Litigating mild TBI cases can be a challenge. For starters, many TBI injuries are often overlooked because patients seem to make a complete recovery. However, many of the longterm consequences of mild TBI can take months or even years to manifest, making it difficult to attribute the symptoms to a prior brain trauma.

While tough to litigate mild TBI cases, it’s not impossible. An argument for causation, prognosis, and future medical expenses can be made. This requires using the latest literature, clinical proof such as PET and SPECT brain scans, and expert testimony to prove to the jury that an invisible injury has occurred.

Questions about a possible mild traumatic brain injury case? Call us toll-free at 1-888-4GARYGREEN or email ggreen@gGreen.com.

Monday, 26 June 2017 13:50

Legal Malpractice

Written by Law Offices Of Gary Green

What is legal malpractice? How do I know if I have a legal malpractice case?

Simply put, legal malpractice occurs when an attorney handles a case improperly or with intent to harm and cause damages to a client. Legal malpractice includes negligence, breach of fiduciary duty, and breach of contract.

Exact definitions vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but you generally need to prove four elements in order to successfully pursue a legal malpractice claim:

  1. The existence of an attorney-client relationship, creating a duty on the part of the attorney;
  2. a breach of that duty;
  3. injury or harm caused by the breach of duty; and
  4. significant financial loss or damages due to the injury or harm.

A successful legal malpractice case must prove that the attorney’s actions were the result of errors that no reasonable or prudent attorney would make. Furthermore, legal malpractice requires proof of what would have happened had the attorney not been negligent. It must be clear that the injured party would have prevailed in their case had the attorney done his or her job.

Questions about a possible legal malpractice case? Call us toll-free at 1-888-4GARYGREEN or email ggreen@gGreen.com.

Law Offices of Gary Green is currently investigating claims against Roundup (glyphosate), a weed and grass killer declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) to be a “probable human carcinogen.”

Multiple studies have suggested a link between glyphosate and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Other reported complications include:

  • birth defects
  • kidney disease
  • leukemia
  • other cancers

Farmers and landscapers may be especially at risk.

Glyphosate, which is the main active ingredient in Roundup and many other products, is the most widely used chemical in agriculture. It has been found in urine, breastmilk, and blood samples, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t test for it among the pesticides it monitors in food supplies.

Glyphosate is also used to quicken the drying process on wheat and oats. Other affected crops may include lentils, peas, corn, potatoes, sunflowers, and soybeans.

Monsanto, who in 2015 earned $4.8 billion in Roundup sales alone, is currently being sued for claiming glyphosate isn’t harmful to people or pets.

Attorney Gary Green was recently on KATV’s Good Morning Arkansas to discuss Uber and Insurance. Click on the image below to watch the segment.