Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as a “closed head injury,” is typically, but not always, preceded by an external blow to the head. Injury to the brain caused by lack of oxygen or blood supply to the brain is called an “anoxic injury.” While the injury may not have seemed detrimental and no loss of consciousness occurred, any type of trauma to the brain can lead to impairment in brain functions with permanent damage.

You may have suffered a traumatic brain injury if any of the following conditions resulted from trauma to the head:

  • Loss of consciousness for any period of time
  • Loss of memory either before or after the incident
  • Any modification in one’s state of mind at the time of the incident e.g. feeling confused, disoriented or dazed
  • Any sort of neurological deficit e.g. numbness or tingling sensations, loss of balance, dizziness, paralysis or loss of muscle control of any type, inability to speak
  • Any sensory loss such as hearing, vision, sense of smell, or taste.

While not all of these symptoms may occur immediately following the incident, it may precipitate a series of events that can be adverse. The possibility of significant damage should be a concern if any of these symptoms follow a head injury. While the listed symptoms may be evident, other inconspicuous symptoms such as irritability, inability to concentrate, and fatigue may signify that trauma has indeed occurred.

A traumatic brain injury will not always show up on an MRI or CAT scan. Dangerous or severe brain injuries can exist while imaging studies appear negative or normal. For example, shear injuries occur at the cellular level where the damage is microscopic in nature, which would not be revealed in conventional imaging techniques. Although it may not be obvious at the time, if you have suffered another serious injury as the result of a specific event, the probability of a brain injury greatly increases. If you suspect that you have been the victim of a traumatic brain injury, yet conventional testing reveals no damage, you should seek a reputable neuro-psychologist who can test your brain function capacity.

The role of an attorney representing an individual who has suffered a traumatic brain injury is vital. Often it will be your lawyer who makes the referral to a neuro-psychologist and Life Care Planner. Our attorneys become your advocate in the medical and insurance community. They help ensure that you get the necessary specialized treatment–especially in cases where misdiagnosis or mistreatment is suspected. We have the experience and compassion necessary to act successfully on your behalf in your best interests.

Law Offices of Gary Green is a corporate sponsor of the Brain Injury Association (BIA) to whom a donation is given for every victim we represent. If you suspect you have suffered a traumatic brain injury call us toll free and without obligation at 1-888-442-7947 or send us an e-mail at ggreen@gGreen.com if you have questions or need additional information.

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